Population Growth

Topics: Population, World population, Demography Pages: 7 (2495 words) Published: June 8, 2013
UNIVERSITY OF DAR ES SALAAM
COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SOCIAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY

INDIVIDUAL ASSIGNMENT GE247:POPULATION STUDIES DR. J KIVELIA NAME: DESDERIUS DITRICK MWIZILYA REG #; 2011-04-05382 BAGEN

QN. Provide critical argument for and againstthe conention that population growth is the hindrance for socio -economic growth particularly in developing countries.

Popula-tion growth means that is the increase in number of people in a particular geographical area. Popula-tion growth is found in developing countries which are in three continents which are Africa, Asia and South America hich are called third world countries. Reasons for popula-tion growth in third world countries are Economic factorssuch as labour force in agriculture and Social factors such as sex preference,prestige, for security, Early marriages and poligamism, improved health services,food availability and modern life.

THE CAUSES OF RAPID POPULATION GROWTH
According to Ehrlich[1990] Until recently, birth rates and death rates were about the same, keeping the population stable. People had many children, but a large number of them died before age five.During the Industrial Revolution, a period of history in Europe and North America where there were great advances in science and technology, the success in reducing death rates was attributable to several factors: (1) in-creases in food production and distribution, (2) improvement in public health (water and sanitation), and (3) medical technology (vaccines and antibiotics), along with gains in education and standards of living within many developing nations.Without these attributes present in many children's lives, they could not have survived common diseases like measles or the flu. People were able to fight and cure deadly germs that once killed them. In addition, because of the technology, people could produce more and different kinds of food. Gradually, over a period of time, these discoveries and inventions spread throughout the world, lowering death rates and improving the quality of life for most people. Food Production Distribution The remarkable facts about the last 150 years has been the ability of farmers to increase food production geometrically in some places. Agricultural practices have improved in the United States in the last two centuries. Much of the world experi-enced agricultural success, especially in the last 50 years. Between 1950 and 1984, for example, the amount of grain harvested worldwide increased from 631 million tons to 1.65 billion tons. This represents a gain of 2.6 times at a time when the world population increased by only 1.9 times. In more recent years, the technology has produced a broader variety of tech-niques: new kinds of seed, chemical fertilizers, pesticides, and more sophisticated machinery. The use of technology has made possible the rapid expansion of agri-culture in the United States and other MDCs and LDCs. The use of pesticides in LDCs, for example was expected to increased between 400 to 600% in the last 25 years of the twentieth century. During the past 10 years, the world's food production has increased by 24 per cent, outpacing the rate of population growth.However, this increase was not evenly distributed throughout the world. For example, in Africa, food pro-duction decreased, while population increased. And world cereal production fell in 1993, according to the FAO, which predicted a food shortage in 20 countries during 1994. 12 However, most experts agree that there is no shortage of food, and that equitable distribution should be sufficient to meet all needs for the future. Lack of money to buy food is the problem of malnourishment. Pov-erty, in effect translates the world adequacy into national and local shortages. Within households, men and boys have priority for whatever food is available, while women and children, especially girl children are the first to suffer malnu-trition. Few resources are available to women, even though...
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