My Experience

Topics: Psychology, Self-esteem, Implicit self-esteem Pages: 3 (948 words) Published: July 28, 2013
“Everything that happens to you is a reflection of what you believe about yourself. We cannot outperform our level of self-esteem. We cannot draw to ourselves more than we think we are worth.”― Iyanla Vanzant “Everything that happens to you is a reflection of what you believe about yourself. We cannot outperform our level of self-esteem. We cannot draw to ourselves more than we think we are worth.”― Iyanla Vanzant

CheckPoint Self-Esteem

CheckPoint Self-Esteem

By: Catherine Snowden
PSY/220 Positive Psychology
Instructor: Tricia Henderson M.Ed.
5/10/2013

By: Catherine Snowden
PSY/220 Positive Psychology
Instructor: Tricia Henderson M.Ed.
5/10/2013

CheckPoint-Self-Esteem

Self-esteem is a term used in psychology to reflect a person's overall emotional evaluation of his or her own worth. It is a judgment of oneself as well as an attitude toward the self. Self-esteem encompasses beliefs (for example, "I am competent," "I am worthy") and emotions such as triumph, despair, pride and shame. Smith and Mackie define it by saying "The self-concept is what we think about the self; self-esteem is the positive or negative evaluations of the self, as in how we feel about it." Self-esteem is also known as the evaluative dimension of the self that includes feelings of worthiness, prides and discouragement. One's self-esteem is also closely associated with self-consciousness. A person can have a high self-esteem and hold it confidently where they do not need reassurance from others to maintain their positive self-view, whereas others with defensive, high self-esteem may still report positive self-evaluations on the Rosenberg Scale, as all high self-esteem individuals do; however, their positive self-views are fragile and vulnerable to criticism. Defensive high self-esteem individuals internalize subconscious self-doubts and insecurities causing them to react very negatively to any criticism they may receive. There is a need for...

References: 1. Hewitt, John P. (2009). Oxford Handbook of Positive Psychology. Oxford University Press. pp. 217–224.
2. E. R. Smith/D. M. Mackie, Social Psychology (2007)p. 107
3. Newman, Barbara M., and Philip R. Newman. Development through Life: A Psychosocial Approach. Homewood, IL: Dorsey, 1975. Print.
4. Schacter, Daniel. L "Psychology"
5. Jordan, C. H., Spencer, S. J., & Zanna, M. P. (2003). "I love me...I love me not": Implicit self-esteem, explicit self-esteem and defensiveness. In S. J. Spencer, S. Fein, M. P. Zanna, & J. M. Olsen (eds.), Motivated social perception: The Ontario symposium (Vol. 9, pp. 117-145). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.
6. Jordan, C. H., Spencer, S. J., Zanna, M. P., Hoshino-Browne, E., & Correll, J. (2003). Secure and defensive high self-esteem. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 85, 969-978.
7. Positive Psychology, by Steve R. Baumgardner and Marie K. Crothers. Published by Prentice Hall. Copyright © 2009 by Pearson Education, Inc.
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